verbiage

verbiage, redundancy, tautology, pleonasm, circumlocution, periphrasis are comparable when they denote a fault of style or a form or mode of expression involving the use of too many words.
Verbiage may imply delight in words for their own sake (as for their sound, their color, or their suggestions) and overindulgence in their use for these reasons; the term, however, often suggests a pointless or habitual wordiness that tends to make what is written dull, meaningless, obscure, or unduly heavy reading
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his concise and well-informed speeches were welcomed amid the common verbiage of debate— Buchan

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the almost luscious richness of Aunt Phoebe's imagination, her florid verbiage, her note of sensuous defiance— H. G. Wells

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Redundancy does not in general carry the implications of expansiveness, floridity, or heaviness so often apparent in verbiage; but the term sometimes implies the use of more words than are required by idiom or syntax and so suggests a fault of style
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redundancies result. . . when the writer fails to perceive the scope of a word— Westley

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the . . . florid redundancy of Italian prose— Ellis

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Tautology is needless or useless repetition of the same idea in different words
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he cautioned his students to beware of such tautologies as "visible to the eye" and "audible to the ear"

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Pleonasm implies the use of syntactically unnecessary words as in "the man he said." Sometimes pleonastic expressions are acceptable means of emphasis and are thought of as figures of speech
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it is a pleonasm, a figure usual in Scripture, by a multiplicity of expressions to signify one notable thing— South

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Circumlocution and periphrasis denote a roundabout or indirect way of saying a thing
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the gift of the pamphleteer, who cuts through academic circumlocutionDean

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this was not however a question to be asked point-blank, and I could not think of any effective circumlocutionConrad

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one of those anomalous practitioners in lower departments of the law who . . . deny themselves all indulgence in the luxury of too delicate a conscience (a periphrasis which might be abridged considerably)—De Quincey

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"The answer is in the negative" is a periphrasis for "no"— Time

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Analogous words: wordiness, verboseness, prolixity, diffuseness (see corresponding adjectives at WORDY)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • verbiage — [ vɛrbjaʒ ] n. m. • 1671; de verbier vx « gazouiller »; picard werbler, du frq. °werbilan, werbillon « tourbillonner »; rattaché plus tard à verbe ♦ Abondance de paroles, de mots vides de sens ou qui disent peu de chose. ⇒ bavardage, délayage,… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Verbiage — Ver bi*age (?; 48), n. [F. verbiage, from OF. verbe a word. See {Verb}.] The use of many words without necessity, or with little sense; a superabundance of words; verbosity; wordiness. [1913 Webster] Verbiage may indicate observation, but not… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • verbiage — Verbiage. s. m. Abondance de paroles qui ne disent presque rien, qui contiennent peu de sens. Il n y a que du verbiage dans ce livre, dans cette harangue. c est un verbiage continuel. Il est du stile familier …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • verbiage — 1721, from Fr. verbiage wordiness (17c.), from M.Fr. verbier to chatter, from O.Fr. verbe word, from L. verbum word (see VERB (Cf. verb)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • verbiage — index bombast, fustian, language, prattle, prolixity, tautology Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • verbiage — [n] repetition, wordiness circumlocution, expansiveness, floridity, long windedness, loquacity, periphrase, periphrasis, pleonasm, prolixity, redundancy, tautology, verbosity; concepts 278,695 Ant. conciseness …   New thesaurus

  • verbiage — ► NOUN ▪ excessively lengthy or technical speech or writing. ORIGIN French, from obsolete verbeier to chatter …   English terms dictionary

  • verbiage — [vʉr′bē ij΄] n. [Fr < OFr verbier, to speak, chatter < verbe: see VERB] 1. an excess of words beyond those needed to express concisely what is meant; wordiness 2. style of expression; diction …   English World dictionary

  • Verbiage — Sur les autres projets Wikimedia : « Verbiage », sur le Wiktionnaire (dictionnaire universel) Un verbiage est un discours avec une abondance de paroles qui disent peu de choses. Historiquement du moyen français (1671), de verbier,… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • verbiage — (vèr bi a j ) s. m. Abondance de paroles et absence d idées. •   Ma plume a fait le reste ; car je vous assure que les plumes ont grand part à l infinité du verbiage dont nous remplissons nos lettres, SÉV. 5 janv. 1676. •   Il s était mis en… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

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